Coinage Act of 1792



Coinage Act of 1792

An act establishing a mint, and regulating the Coins of the United States [Coinage Act of 1792] was passed by the United States Congress on April 2, 1792 and established the United States Mint.  The Coinage Act of 1792 established the silver dollar as the unit of money in the United States, declared it to be lawful tender, and created a decimal system for U.S. currency.  The act situated he Mint was in the seat of government of the United States, Philadelphia. The five original officers of the U.S. Mint were a Director, an Assayer, a Chief Coiner, an Engraver, and a Treasurer.  The Act reads as Follows:

1796 Silver Dollar  



By: Stanley Yavneh Klos






  • First United American Republic: United Colonies of North America: 13 British Colonies United in Congress was founded by 12 colonies on September 5th, 1774 (Georgia joined in 1775)  and governed through a British Colonial Continental Congress.  Peyton Randolph and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief;
  • Second United American Republic: The United States of America: 13 Independent States United in Congress was founded by 12 states on July 2nd, 1776 (New York abstained until July 8th), and governed through the United States Continental CongressJohn Hancock and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Third United American Republic: The United States of America: A Perpetual Union was founded by 13 States on March 1st, 1781, with the enactment of the first U.S. Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, and governed through the United States in Congress Assembled.  Samuel Huntington and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Fourth United American Republic: The United States of America: We the People  was formed by 11 states on March 4th, 1789 (North Carolina and Rhode Island joined in November 1789 and May 1790, respectively), with the enactment of the U.S. Constitution of 1787. The fourth and current United States Republic governs through  the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in Congress Assembled, the U.S. President and Commander-in-Chief, and the U.S. Supreme Court.  George Washington served as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief.

An Act establishing a Mint, and regulating
the coins of the United States.


April 2, 1792


Mint established at the seat of government

Section I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of American in Congress assembled, and it is hereby enacted and declared, That a mint for the purpose of a national coinage be, and the same is established, to be situate and carried on at the seat of the government of the United States, for the time being: And that for the well conducting of the business of the said mint, there shall be the following officers and persons, namely, --a Director, an Assayer, a Chief Coiner, an Engraver, a Treasurer.

Director to employ workmen, &c

Section 2. And be it further enacted, That the Director of the mint shall employ as many clerks. workmen and servants, as he shall from time to time find necessary, subject to the approbation of the President of the United States.



Duty of the officers:  Assayer - Chief Coiner - Engraver - Treasurer.

Section 3. And be it further enacted, That the respective functions and duties of the officers above mentioned shall be a follow: The Director of the mint shall have the chief management of the business thereof, and shall superintend all other officers and persons who shall be employed therein. the Assayer shall receive and give receipts for all metals which may lawfully be brought to the mint to be coined; shall assay all such of them as may require it, and shall deliver them to the Chief Coiner to be coined. The Chief Coiner shall cause to be coined all metals which shall be received by him for that purpose, according to such regulations as shall be prescribed by this or any future law. The Engraver shall sink and prepare the necessary dies for such coinage, with the proper devices and inscriptions, but shall be lawful for the functions and duties of Chief Coiner and engraver to be preformed by one person. The Treasurer shall receive from the Chief Coiner all the coins which shall have been struck, and shall pay or deliver them to the persons respectively to whom the same ought to be paid or delivered: he shall moreover receive and safely keep all monies which shall be for the use, maintenance and support of the mint, and shall disburse the same upon warrants signed by the Director.

Oath

Section 4. And be it further enacted, That every officer and clerk of the said mint shall, before he enters upon the execution of his office, take an oath or affirmation before some judge of the United States faithfully and diligently to perform the duties thereof.

Bond

Section 5. And be it further enacted, That the said assayer, chief coiner and treasurer, previously to entering upon the execution of their respective offices, shall each become bound to the United States of America, with one or more sureties to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Treasury, in the sum of ten thousand dollars, with condition for the faithful and diligent performance of the duties of his office.

Salaries

Section 6. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed and paid as compensation for their respective services--To the said director, a yearly salary of two thousand dollars, to the said assayer, a yearly salary of one thousand five hundred dollars, to the said chief coiner, a yearly salary of one thousand five hundred dollars, to the said engraver, a yearly salary of one thousand two hundred dollars, to the said treasurer, a yearly salary of one thousand two hundred dollars, to each clerk who may be employed, a yearly salary not exceeding five hundred dollars, and such wages and allowances as are customary and reasonable, according to their respective stations and occupations.


First US Mint, Philadelphia


Accounts how and where to be settled.

Section 7. And be it further enacted, That the accounts of the officers and persons employed in and about the said mint and for services performed in relation thereto, and all other accounts concerning the business and administration thereof, shall be adjusted and settled in the treasury department of the United States, and a quarter yearly account of the receipts and disbursements of the said mint shall be rendered at the said treasury for settlement according to such forms and regulations as shall have been prescribed by the department; and that once in each year a report of the transactions of the said mint, accompanied by an abstract of the settlements which shall have been from time to time made, duly certified by the comptroller of the treasury, shall be laid before Congress for their information.

President of U.S. to cause buildings to be provided.

Section 8. And be it further enacted, That in addition to the authority vested in the president of the United States by a resolution of the last session, touching the engaging of artists and the procuring of apparatus for the said mint, the President be authorized, and he is hereby authorized to cause to be provided and put in proper condition such buildings, and in such manner as shall appear to him requisite for the purpose of carrying on the business of the said mint; and that as well the expenses which shall have incurred pursuant to the said resolution as those which may be incurred in providing and preparing the said buildings, and all other expenses which may hereafter accure for the maintenance and support of the said mint, and in carrying on the business thereof, over and above the sums which may be received by reason of the rate per centum for coinage herein after mentioned, shall be defrayed from the treasury of the United States, out of any monies which from time to time shall be therein, not otherwise appropriated.


1797 Ten Dollar Gold Eagle 


Species of the coins to be struck.

Section 9. And be it further enacted, That there shall be from time to time struck and coined at the said mint, coins of gold, silver, and copper, of the following denominations, values and descriptions, viz. EAGLES -- each to be of the value of ten dollars or units, and to contain two hundred and forty-seven grains and four eighths of a grain of pure, or two hundred and seventy grains of standard gold. HALF EAGLES --each to be of the value of five dollars, and to contain one hundred and twenty-three grains and six eighths of a grain of pure, or one hundred and thirty-five grains of standard gold. QUARTER EAGLES -- each to be of the value of two dollars and a half dollar, and to contain sixty-one grains and seven eighths of a grain of pure, or sixty-seven grains and four eighths of a grain of standard gold. DOLLARS OR UNITS -- each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of standard silver. HALF DOLLARS -- each to be of half the value of the dollar or unit, and to contain one hundred and eighty-five grains and ten sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or two hundred and eight grains of standard silver. QUARTER DOLLAR -- each to be of one fourth the value of the dollar or unit, and to contain ninety-two grains and thirteen sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or one hundred and four grains of standard silver. DISMES -- each to be of the value of one tenth of a dollar or unit, and to contain thirty- seven grains and two sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or forty-one grains and three fifths parts of a grain of standard silver. HALF DISMES -- each to be of the value of one twentieth of a dollar, and to contain eighteen grains and nine sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or twenty grains and four fifths parts of a grain of standard silver. CENTS -- each to be of the value of the one hundredth part of a dollar, and to contain eleven penny-weights of copper. HALF CENTS -- each to be of the value of half a cent, and to contain five penny-weights and a half a penny-weight of copper.


1794 Half Disme  


Of what devices.

Section 10. And be it further enacted, That, upon the said coins respectively, there shall be the following devices and legends, namely: Upon one side of each of the said coins there shall be an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscription of the word Liberty, and the year of the coinage; and upon the reverse of each of the gold and silver coins there shall be the figure or representation of an eagle, with this inscription, "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" and upon the reverse of each of the copper coins, there shall be an inscription which shall express the denomination of the piece, namely, cent or half cent, as the case may require.




Proportional value of gold to silver.

Section 11. And be it further enacted, That the proportional value of gold and silver in all coins which shall by law be current as money within the United States, shall be fifteen to one, according to quantity in weight, of pure gold or pure silver; that is to say, every fifteen pounds weight of pure silver shall be of equal value in all payments, with one pound weight of pure gold, and so in proportion as to any greater or less quantities of the respective metals.


5 Dollar Gold Eagle - 1798  


Standard for gold coins, and allow how to be regulated.
Director to report the practice of the mint touching the alloy of gold coins.

Section 12. And be it further enacted, That the standard for all gold coins of the United States shall be eleven parts fine to one part alloy; and accordingly that eleven parts fine to one part alloy; and accordingly that eleven parts in twelve of the entire weight of each of the said coins shall consist of pure gold, and the remaining one twelfth part of alloy; and the said alloy shall be composed of silver and copper, in such proportions not exceeding one half silver as shall be found convenient; to be regulated by the director of the mint, for the time being, with the approbation of the President of the United States, until further provision shall be made by law. And to the end that the necessary information may be had in order to the making of such further provision, it shall be the duty of the director of the mint, at the expiration of a year commencing the operations of the said mint, to report to Congress the practice thereof during the said year, touching the composition of the alloy of the said gold coins, the reasons for such practice, and the experiments and observations which shall have been made concerning the effects of different proportions of silver and copper in the said alloy.



Standard for silver coins--alloy how to be regulated.

Section 13. And be it further enacted, That the standard for all silver coins of the United States, shall be one thousand four hundred and eighty-five parts fine to one hundred and seventy-nine parts alloy; and accordingly that one thousand four hundred and eighty-five parts in one thousand six hundred and sixty-four parts of the entire weight of each of the said coins shall consist of pure silver, and the remaining one hundred and seventy-nine parts of alloy; which alloy shall be wholly of copper.




Persons may bring gold and silver bullion, to be coined free of expense
how the director may exchange coins therefor, deducting half per cent
Duty of Sectary of Treasury herein.
The half percent to constitute a fund, &c.

Section 14. And be it further enacted, that it shall be lawful for any person or persons to bring to the said mint gold and silver bullion in order to their being coined; and that the bullion so brought shall be there assayed and coined as speedily as may be after the receipt thereof, and free of expense to the person or persons by whom the same shall have been brought. And as soon as the said bullion shall have been coined, the person or persons by whom the same shall have been delivered, shall upon demand receive in lieu thereof coins of the same species of bullion which shall have been so delivered, weight for weight, of the pure gold or pure silver therein contained: Provided nevertheless, That it shall be at the mutual option of the party or parties bringing such bullion, and of the director of said mint, to make an immediate exchange of coins for standard bullion, with a deduction of one half percent from the weight of the pure gold, or pure silver contained in the said bullion, as an indemnification to the mint for the time which will necessarily be required for coining the said bullion, and for the advance which shall have been so made in coins. And it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to furnish the said mint from time to time whenever the state of the treasury will admit thereof, with such sums as may be necessary for effecting the said exchanges, to be replaced as speedily as may be out of the coins which shall have been made of the bullion for which the monies so furnished shall have been exchanged; and the said deductions of one half percent shall constitute a fund towards defraying the expenses of the said mint.


1794 Large Cent


Order of delivering coins to persons bringing bullion, and
penalty on giving undue preference, &c.

Section 15. And be it further enacted, That the bullion which shall be brought as aforesaid to the mint to be coined, shall be coined, and the equivalent thereof in coins rendered, if demanded, in the order in which the said bullion shall have been brought or delivered, giving priority according to priority of delivery only, and without preference to any person or persons; and if any preference shall be given contrary to the direction aforesaid, the officer by whom such undue preference shall be given, shall in each case forfeit and pay one thousand dollars; to be recovered with costs of suit. And to the end that it may be known it such preference shall at any time be given, the assayer or officer to whom the said bullion shall be delivered to be coined shall give to the person or persons bringing the same, a memorandum in writing under his hand denoting the weight, fineness and value thereof, together with the day and order of its delivery into the mint.

1794 Silver Half-Dollar


Coins made a lawful tender

Section 16. And be it further enacted, That all the gold and silver coins which shall have been struck at, and issued from the said mint, shall be a lawful tender in all payments whatsoever, those of full weight according to the respective values herein before declared, and those of less than full weight at values proportional to their respective weights.

And to be made conformable to the standard weights, &c

Section 17. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the respective officers of the said mint carefully and faithfully to use their best endeavours that all the gold and silver coins which shall be struck at the said mint shall be, as nearly as may be, conformable to the several standards and weights aforesaid, and that the copper whereof the cents and half cents aforesaid may be composed, shall be of good quality.



The Treasurer to reserve not less than three pieces or
each coin to be assayed; and when and by whom, &c

Section 18. And the better to secure a due conformity of the said gold and silver coins to their respective standards, Be it further enacted, That from every separate mass of standard gold or silver, which shall be made into coins at the said mint, there shall be taken, set apart by the treasurer and reserved in his custody a certain number of pieces, not less -than three, and that once in every year the pieces so set apart and reserved, shall be assayed under the inspection of the Chief Justice of the United States, the Secretary and Comptroller of the Treasury, the Secretary for the department of State, and the Attorney General of the United States (who are hereby required to attend for that purpose at the said mint, on the last Monday in July in each year,) or under the inspection of any three of them, in such manner as they or a majority of them shall direct, and in the presence of the director, assayer and chief coiner of the said mint; and if it shall be found that the gold and silver so assayed shall not be inferior to their respective standards herein before declared more than one part in one hundred and forty-four parts. the officer or officers of the said mint whom it may concern shall be held excusable; but if any greater inferiority shall appear it shall be certified to the President of the United States, and the said officer or officers shall he deemed disqualified to hold their respective offices.

Penalty on debasing the coins.

Section 19. And be it further enacted, That if any of the gold or silver coins which shall be struck or coined at the said mint shall be debased or made worse as to the proportion of the fine gold or fine silver therein contained, or shall be of less weight or value than the same out to be pursuant to the directions of this act, through the default or with the connivance of any of the officers or persons who shall be employed at the said mint, for the purpose of profit or gain, or otherwise with a fraudulent intent, and if any of the said officers or persons shall embezzle any of the metals which shall at any time be committed to their charge for the purpose of being coined, or any of the coins which shall be struck or coined at the said mint, every such officer or person who shall commit any or either of the said offenses, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall suffer death.

Money of account to be expressed in dollars, &c.

ection 20. And be if further enacted, That the money of account of the United States shall be expressed in dollars, or units, dimes or tenths, cents or hundredths, and the milles or thousandths, a dime being the tenth part of a dollar, a cent the hundredth part of a dollar, a mille the thousandth part of a dollar, and that all accounts in the public offices and all proceedings in the courts of the United States shall be kept and had in conformity to this regulation.

APPROVED, April 2, 1792






US Coin Mintage 1792 to 1892


Double Eagle  Authorized to be coined, Act of March 3, 1849.  

Double Eagle

Authorized to be coined, Act of March 3, 1849. Weight, 516 grains; fineness, 900; size, 21.  1850 to 1865, inclusive. No. 1. Obverse; Liberty head, facing left, hair tied behind, a coronet on the forehead inscribed “liberty," thirteen stars and date. Reverse: An eagle with shield upon its breast, and an olive branch and three arrows in its talons; in its beak, an elaborate scroll, inscribed "E PLURIBUS UNUM." Above, a circle of thirteen stars and a curved line of rays extending from wing to wing, "United States of America." "twenty d." 1866 to 1876, inclusive. No. 2, same, with the motto "in god we trust" inscribed within the circle of stars on the reverse.
 1877. No. 3. Same, with "twenty dollars" for "twenty d."
  


Eagle

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 270 grains; fineness, 916.10. Weight changed. Act of June 28, 1834, to 258 grains. Fineness changed, Act of June 28, 1834, to 899.225. Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900.
 1795. Obverse: Liberty head, wearing a cap, facing right. Fifteen stars. Above, "liberty;" beneath, "1795;" size, 21. Reverse: An eagle with displayed wings, standing on a palm branch; in beak, a laurel wreath, "United States of America."
 1796. Same, with sixteen stars.
 1797. No. 1. Same, with sixteen stars.
 1797. No. 2. Obverse : Same, with sixteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with the United States shield upon its breast, a bundle of arrows in the right talon, and an olive branch in the left; in its beak, a scroll inscribed "e pluribus unum." Around (he head are sixteen stars; above, is a curved line of clouds extending from wing to wing. "United States of America"
 1798 to 1801, inclusive. Same, with thirteen stars on the obverse. Of 1798, two varieties with four stars facing.
 1802. None issued.
 1803 and 1804. Same as No. 2 of 1797. Thirteen stars.
 1805 to 1837, inclusive. None issued.
 1838 to 1865, inclusive. Obverse: Liberty head facing left, hair tied behind, a coronet on the forehead inscribed "liberty," thirteen stars, and date.
Reverse: An eagle with the United States shield upon its breast, and an olive branch and three arrows in the talons, "United States of America" Size, 17.
 1866. Same, with a scroll above the eagle inscribed "in god we trust."
 


Half Eagle

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 135 grains; fineness, 916.1. Weight changed, Act of June 28, 1834, to 129 grains.  Fineness changed, Act of June 28, 1834, to 899.225. Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900.
 1795. No. 1. Same type as the Eagle; size, 16.
 1795. No. 2. Obverse: Same. Reverse: An eagle, wings extended upwards, with the United States shield upon its breast, a bundle of thirteen arrows in the right talon, and an olive branch in the left. In its beak, a scroll inscribed " E pluribus Unum" Around the head .are sixteen stars, and above is a curved line of clouds extending from wing to wing, "United States of America."1796. Same as No. 1 of 1795; fifteen stars on obverse.
 1797. No. 1. Same as No. 1 of 1795.
 1797. No. 2. Same, with sixteen stars on obverse.
 1797. No. 3. Obverse: Same, with fifteen stars. Reverse: Same as No. 2 of 1795, sixteen stars around the eagle.
 1798. No. 1. Same as No. 1 of 1795, with thirteen stars.  1798. No. 2. Obverse: Same.  Reverse: Same as No. 2 of 1795, thirteen stars.
 1799 and 1800. Same as No. 2 of 1795, with thirteen stars on the obverse.
 1801. None issued.
 1802 to 1806, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1795, with thirteen stars on the obverse.
 1807. No. 1. Obverse: Same as No. 1, 1795, with thirteen stars. Reverse: Same as No. 2, 1795.
 1807. No. 2. Obverse : Liberty head, facing left ; bust, draped, wearing a kind of turban with a band in front inscribed "liberty," thirteen stars, and date. Reverse: An eagle, with the United States shield upon its breast, an olive branch and three arrows in the talons. Above, a scroll, inscribed "E Pluribus Unum." United States of America "5. D."
 1808 to 1812 inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1807.
 1813 to 1815, inclusive. Obverse: Liberty head, facing left, wearing a kind of turlian, a band in front inscribed “liberty." Thirteen stars and date. No shoulders. Reverse: Same as No. 2 of 1807.
 1816 and 1817, inclusive. None issued.
 1818 to 1828, inclusive. Same as 1813.
 1829. No. 1. Same as 1813 ; size, 16.
 1829. No. 2. Same, but smaller; size, 15.
 1830 to 1833, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1829.
 1834. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1829.
 1834. No. 2. Obverse: Liberty head, facing left, hair confined by a band inscribed " liberty." Reverse: Same as No. 2 of 1807, without the motto " e pluribus Unum" omitted ; size, 14.
 1835 to 1838, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1834.
 1839 to 1865, inclusive. Same type as the Eagle of 1838.
 1866. Same type as Eagle of same date.
  

Three-Dollar Piece

Authorized to be coined. Act of February 21, 1853. Weight, 77.4 grains ; fineness, 900.
 1854. Obverse: An Indian head, wearing a crown of eagle feathers, on band of which is inscribed “liberty” — “United States of America." Reverse: "3 dollars 1854" within a wreath of corn, wheat, cotton, and tobacco. Size, 13.



Quarter-Eagle

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 67.5 grains; fineness, 916. Weight changed, Act of June 28, 1834, to 64.5 grains. Fineness changed. Act of June 28, 1834, to 899.225. Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900.
 1796. No, 1. Obverse : Liberty head, facing right, above " liberty" sixteen stars. Reverse: Same type as No. 2 half-eagle of 1795, size 13. No. 2. Same, with no stars on obverse.
 1797-1798. Same as No. 1 of 1796, with thirteen stars.
 1799-1801, inclusive. None issued.
 1802. Same as 1798.
1803. None issued.
 1804 to 1807, inclusive. Same as 1798.
 1808. Same type as No. 2 half-eagle of 1807, with “2 D."
 1809 to 1820, inclusive. None issued.
 1821. Obverse: Same type as the half-eagle of 1813, size 12. Reverse: Same type as No. 2 half-eagle of 1807. 1822 and 1823. None issued.
 1824-1827, inclusive. Same as 1821. 1828. None issued 1829 to 1833, inclusive. Same as 1821.
 1834. No. 1. Same as 1821. No. 2. Same type as No. 2 half-eagle of

 1834, size 11.
 1835 to 1839, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1834.



1840 to 1865. Same type as the eagle of 1834.

1866. Same type as eagle of 1866.



Gold Dollar

Authorized to be coined. Act of March 3, 1849. Weight, 25.8 grains; fineness, 900.

1849 to 1853, inclusive. Obverse: Same type as the eagle, without date. Reverse: "1 dollar 1849" within a laurel wreath, "united states of America." Size 8.

1854. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same type as the three-dollar piece, Size 9.



1796 Silver Dollar  
Silver Dollar

Authorized to he coined. Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 416 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 412J grains. Fineness changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873. Coinage reauthorized, Act of February 28, 1878.

1794. Obverse: Liberty head, facing right, flowing hair, fifteen stars; above, “liberty;" beneath, "1794." Reverse: An eagle with raised wings, encircled by branches of laurel crossed; "United States of America." On the edge, “hundred cents, ONE DOLLAR OR UNIT." Size, 24.

1795. No. 1. Same.

1795. No. 2. Bust of Liberty, facing right, hair bound by a ribbon, shoulders draped, fifteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings, standing upon clouds, within a wreath of palm and laurel, which is crossed and tied, "United States of America."

1796. Same as No. 2, of 1795.

1797. No. 1. Same as Xo. 2 of 1795, with sixteen stars, six of which are facing.

1797. No. 2. Same, with seven stars facing.

1798. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1795, with fifteen stars.

1798. No. 2. Same, with thirteen stars.

1798. No. 3. Obverse: Same, with thirteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with raised wings, bearing the United States shield upon its breast, in beak, a scroll inscribed "e pluribus Unum." A bundle of thirteen arrows in the right talon, and an olive branch in the left. Above, are clouds, and thirteen stars. " united States of America." Size, 25.

1799 to 1804, inclusive. Same as No. 3, of 1798.

1805 to 1839, inclusive. None issued.

1840 to 1865, inclusive. Obverse: Liberty seated upon a rock, supporting with her right hand tlie United States shield, across which floats a scroll inscribed "liberty," and with her left the staff and liberty cap ; beneath, the date.

Reverse : An eagle with expanded wings, bearing the United States shield upon its breast, and an olive branch and three arrows in its talons. "United States of America," "One Dollar," Reeded edge; size, 24.

1866 to 1873, inclusive. Same, with a scroll above the eagle, inscribed, "in god we trust."

1874 to 1877, inclusive. None issued.

1878. Obverse: Liberty head facing left, upon which is a cap, a wheat and cotton wreath, and a band inscribed "liberty;" above, "e pluribus Unum;" beneath, the date. Thirteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings pointing upwards; in right talon an olive branch with nine leaves; in the left, three arrows. In the field above, "in god we trust;" beneath, a semi- wreath, tied and crossed, reaching upwards to the wings; "united states of America." Some pieces of the above date (1878) were coined with eight feathers in the tail during the year, but seven have been adopted.



Silver Trade Dollar

Authorized to be coined, Act of February 12, 1873. Weight, 420 grains; fineness, 900.

1873. Obverse: Liberty seated upon a cotton bale, facing left ; in her extended right hand an olive branch ; in her left a scroll inscribed " liberty;" behind her a sheaf of wheat; beneath, a scroll inscribed "in god we Trust ;" thirteen stars ; " 1873."

Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings ; in talons three arrows and an olive branch ; above, a scroll inscribed " E pluribus Unum;" beneath, on field, "420 grains;" "900 fine." "United States of America". Size, 24.



Half Dollar

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 208 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 206] grains' Fineness changed. Act of .January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, Act of February 21, 1853, to 192 grains. Weight changed, Act of February 12, 1873, to 122 grams, or 192.9 grains.

1794 and 1795. Same type as the dollar of 1794. On the edge, "Fifty Cents Or Half A Dollar." Size, 21.

1796. No. 1. Same type as No. 2, dollar of 1795, with the denomination, " 2," inscribed on the base of the reverse. No. 2. Same, with sixteen star on the obverse.

1797. Same as No. 2, of 1796.

1798 to 1800, inclusive. None issued.

1801 to 1803 inclusive. Same type as No. 3, dollar of 1798.

1804. None issued.

1805 and 1806. Same as No. 3, dollar of 1798.

1807. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Obverse : Liberty head facing left, wearing a kind of turban, with "liberty" inscribed upon the band. Thirteen stars and date. Reverse : An eagle with expanded wings pointing downwards, bearing upon its breast, the U. S. Shield, an olive branch and three arrows in its talons ; above, in the field, a scroll inscribed " e pluribus Unum ;" beneath 50 C. " UNITED STATES OF AMERICA."

1808 to 1835 inclusive, same as No. 2 of 1807.

1836. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1807. No. 2. Obverse : Same.

Eeverse : An eagle with expanded wings pointing downwards, the U. S. shield upon its breast, an olive branch and three arrows in its talons, 'UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," reeded edge.

1837. Same as No. 2 of 1836.

1838. Obverse : Same as No. 2 of 1836. Reverse : Same ; " half dol." for " 50 c."

1839. No. 1. Same as 1838. No. 2. Same type as dollar of 1840.

1840 to 1852 inclusive, same.

1853. Obverse : Same with an arrow head on each side of the date. Reverse : Same, with a halo of rays around the edge.

1854. Same, without the rays.

1855. Same.

1856 to 1865 inclusive, same, without the arrow lieads.

1866 to 1872 inclusive, same, with scroll above the eagle inscribed "in God WE TRUST." (Some have been occasionally met with, which have been issued by the San Francisco Mint, without this legend in 1866.)

1873. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with arrow heads on each side of the date.

1874. Same.

1875. Same, without the arrow heads.



Silver Quarter Dollar

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 104 grains; Oneness, 892.4. Weight changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 103J grains Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, Act of February 21, 1853, to 96 grains. Weight changed, Act of February 12, 1873, to 6 grams, or 96.45 grains.

1796. Same type as No. 2 dollar of 1795, with reeded edge; size, 18 fifteen stars.

1797 to 1803. None issued.

1804 to 1807, inclusive. Same type as No. 3 dollar of 1798, beneath, “25c."

1808 to 1814, inclusive. None issued.

1815. Same type as No. 2 half dollar of 1807.

1816 and 1817. None issued.

1818 to 1825, inclusive. Same type as No. 2 half dollar of 1807, size 17.

1826. None issued.

1827 and 1828. Same type as No. 2 half dollar of 1807.

1829 and 1830. None issued.

1831 to 1837, inclusive. Same type as half dollar of 1807, with the diameter reduced from size 17 to size 15, and a corresponding increase in thickness and decrease of the size of devices, and the omission of the scroll, inscribed "e PLURiBtrs unum."

1838. No. 1. Same as 1837. No. 2. Same type as the dollar of 1840, with " QUAR. DOL." for "one doll."

1839 to 18.52, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1838.

1853. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with arrow heads on each side of date, and a halo of rays around the edge.

1854 and 1855. Same, without the rays.

1856 to 1865. Same, without the arrow heads.

1866 to 1872, inclusive. Same, with the scroll above the eagle, inscribed "in god we trust."

1873. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with an arrow head on each side of the date.

1874. Same.

1875. Same, without the arrow head.


Twenty-Cent Piece

Authorized to be coined, Act of March 3, 1875. Weight, 5 grams, or 77.16-grains ; fineness, 900. Coinage discontinued. Act of May 2, 1878.

1875 to 1878, inclusive. Obverse : Same type as the dollar of 1840. Reverse: An eagle with displayed wings, three arrows, and an olive branch, two of the leaves of which nearest the stem, together with those drooping from the centre, overlap ; the terminating leaves on the end of the branch, however, do not. On each side a star. Plain edge. " United States of America " Twenty Cents." Size, 14.

1796 US Silver Disme  

Disme

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 41.6 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 41.1 grains. Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed. Act of February 21, 1853, to 38.4 grains. Weight changed. Act of February 12, 1873, to 2i grams, or 38.58 grains.

1796. Same type as the No. 2 dollar of 1795 ; size 13 ; fifteen stars.

1797. No. 1. Same, with sixteen stars on the obverse. No. 2. Same, with thirteen stars on the obverse.

1798. No. 1. Same type as No. 3 dollar of 1798, with sixteen stars. No. 2. With thirteen stars on the obverse.

1799. None issued.

1800 to 1805, inclusive. Same as No. 3 of 1798.

1806. None issued,

1807. Same as No. 2 of 1798.

1808. None issued.

1809. Same type as No. 2 half-dollar of 1807; size, 12.

1810. None issued.

1811. Same as 1809.

1812 to 1813, inclusive. None issued.

1814. Same as 1809.

1815 to 1819, inclusive. None issued.

1820 to ls25, inclusive. Same as 1809.

1826. None issued.

1827 to 1836, inclusive. Same as 1809.

1837. No. 1. Same as 1809. No. 2. Obverse: Liberty seatad. No stars. Reverse: "one dime" within a wreath of laurel. "United States of AMERICA." Size, 11.

1838. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1837. No. 2. Same, with thirteen stars.

1839 to 1852, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1838.

1853. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with an arrow head on each side of the date.

1854 and 1855. Same as No. 2 of 1853.

1856 to 1859, inclusive. Same, without arrow heads.

1860 10 1872, inclusive. Obverse: Same, with “United States of America” instead of stars. Reverse: "one dime" within a wreath of corn, wheat, cotton, and
tobacco.

1873. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with an arrow head on each side of the date.

1874. Same as No. 2 of 1873.

1875. Same, without arrow heads.


Half Dime

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 20.8 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed, Act of .January 18, 1837, to 205 grains. Fineness changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, Act of February '21, 1853, to 19.2 grains. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873.

1794 and 1795. Same type as the half dollar; size, 10.

1796. Same type as No. 2 dollar of 1795; fifteen stars.

1797. No. 1. Same, with fifteen stars. No. 2. Same, with sixteen stars. No.3. Same, with thirteen stars.

1798 and 1799. None issued.

1800 to 1803, inclusive. Same type as No. 3 dollar of 1798.

1804. None issued.

1805. Same as 1800.

1806 to 1828, inclusive. None issued.



Three Cent Piece

Authorized to be coined. Act of March 3, 1851. Weight, 12 grains; fineness, 750. Weight changed, Act of March 3, 1853, to 11.52 grains. Fineness changed. Act of March 3, 1853, to 900. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873.

1851 to 1853, inclusive. Obverse: A star bearing the United States shield. “United States of America.”  Reverse: An ornamented "o," within which is the denomination "lii;" around the border, thirteen stars; size, 9.

1854 to 1858. Obverse: Same, with two lines around the star. Reverse: An olive branch above the " iii," and three arrows below, all within the " c."

1858 to 1873, inclusive. Same, with one line around the star.   


Five cent piece (Nickel)

Authorized to be coined. Act of May 16, 1866. Weight, 77.16 grains; composed of 75 per cent, copper, and 25 per cent, nickel.

1866. Obverse : A United States shield surmounted by a cross, an olive branch pendent at each side, back of the base of the shield are two arrows, the heads and feathers are only visible; beneath, "1866;" above, in the field, " IN GOD WE TRUST." Reverse : " 5 " within a circle of thirteen stars, and rays, " UNITED STATES OF AMERICA." Size, 13.

1867. Same. No. 2. Same, without the rays

1868. Same as No. 2 of 1867.

1869 to 1882. Same as No. 2 of 1867.

1883. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Obverse: Liberty head wearing a coronet which is inscribed " liberty," thirteen stars, and date, " 1883." Reverse : A " V " within a wreath of corn and cotton. Legend, “United States of America” Exergue, " E Pluribus Unum." No. 3, Obverse: Same as No. 2. Reverse: Same, with "cents " as the exergue, and "E pluribus unum" above the wreath.

1884. Same as No. 3 of the preceding.


Three cent piece

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 3, 1865. Weight, 30 grains; composed of 75 per cent, copper, and 25 per cent, nickel.

1865. Obverse : Liberty head, facing left, hair bound by a ribbon, on the forehead a coronet inscribed " liberty ;" beneath, the date, “United States of America”  Reverse; "lll" within a laurel wreath.

Minor Coins Two Cent Piece (bronze).

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 22, 1864. Weight, 96 grains, composed of ninety-five per cent, copper and five per cent, of tin and zinc. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873.

1864 to 1873, inclusive. Obverse: The United States shield, behind which are two arrows, crossed, on each side a branch of laurel; above a scroll inscribed “in god we trust; " beneath, the date. Reverse: "2 cents" within a wreath of wheat, “United States of America” Size, 14.

Cent (copper)

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 22, 1792. Weight, 264 grains. Weight changed. Act of January 14, 1793, to 208 grains. Weight changed by proclamation of the President, January 26, 1796, in conformity with an Act of March 3, 1795, to 168 grains. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 21, 1857.

1793. No. 1. Obverse : Liberty head, facing right, flowing hair. Above "liberty": beneath, "1793." '

Reverse: A chain of fifteen links, within which is inscribed "one cent" and the fraction "" United States of America; reeded edge ; size, 17.

No. 2. Same, with the abbreviation "ameri." in the Legend.

No. 3. Obverse: Same as No. 1, with a sprig beneath.

Reverse: "one cent" within a wreath of laurel, “United States of America.” Reeded edge.

No. 4. Obverse: A bust of Liberty, facing right, with pole and liberty cap. Above, "LIBERTY'"; beneath, " 1793."

Reverse: Same as No. 3 ; on the edge, " one hundred for a dollar " Size, 18.

1794 and 1795. Same as No. 4 of 1793.

1796. No. 1 . Same. No. 2. Same, with hair bound by a ribbon and without pole and Liberty cap on the obverse. Plain edge.

1797 to 1807 inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1796.

1808 to 1814, inclusive. Obverse: Liberty head, facing left, hair confined by a band, inscribed " liberty." Thirteen stars and date.

Reverse: "one cent," within a laurel wreath, “United States of America.” The fraction "j-JV' is omitted.

1815. None issued.

1816. Obverse: Liberty head, facing left, the lair is confined by a roll, and tied by a cord, while the forehead is decked with a tiara, inscribed "LIBERTY."

Reverse: Same as 1808.

1817. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with fifteen stars. 1818 to 1836. Same as No. 1 of 1817.

1837. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with the lair tied by a string of beads instead of a cord.

1838 to 1857, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1837.


Cent (Nickel)

Authorized to be coined. Act of February 21, 1857. Weight 72 grains; composed of 88 per cent, copper and 12 per cent, nickel. Coinage discontinued. Act of April 22, 1864.

1857 and 1858. Obverse: An eagle lying to the left, “United States of America”

Reverse: "one cent," within a wreath of corn, wheat, cotton, and tobacco. Size, 11.

1859. Obverse : An Indian-head, facing left, bedecked with eagle plumes, confined. “United States of America” Beneath, the date. Reverse: "one cent." within a wreath of laurel.

1860 to 1864, inclusive. Obverse: Same. Reverse: "one cent," within an oak wreath and shield.


Cent (Bronze)

Coinage authorized, Act of April 22, 1857. Weight, 48 grains; composed of 95 per cent, copper and 5 per cent, of tin and zinc.

1864. Same type as nickel cent of 1860. Size, 12.



Half-Cent (Copper)

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 132 grains. Weight changed, Act of January 14, 1793, to 104 grains. Weight changed by proclamation of the President, January 26, 1796, in conformity with Act of March 3, 1795, to 84 grains. Coinage discontinued. Act of February 21, 1857.

1793. Same type as cent No. 4, 1793, with head facing left. On the edge, "two hundred for a dollar." Size, 14.

1794. Same type as the cent of 1794.

1795 to 1797, inclusive. Same, with plain edge.

1798 and 1799. None issued.

1800. Same type as No. 2 cent of 1796, with the fraction "^is" on the base of the reverse.

1801. None issued.

1802 to 1808, inclusive. Same as 1800. From 1808, the fraction "^-J-," omitted.

1809 to 1811, inclusive. Same type as cent of 1808.

1812 to 1824, inclusive. None issued.

1825 and 1826. Same type as cent of 1808.

1827. None issued.

1828. No. 1. Same type as cent 1808, with thirteen stars. No. 2. Same, with twelve stars.

1829. Same, with thirteen stars.

1830. None issued.

1831 to 1836, inclusive. Same type as cent of 1808.

1837 to 1839, inclusive. None issued.

1840 to 1857, inclusive. Same type as No. 2 cent of 1837; size, 14. 
 1840 to 1865. Same type as the eagle of 1834.
 1866. Same type as eagle of 1866.
 
Dollar

Authorized to be coined. Act of March 3, 1849. Weight, 25.8 grains; fineness, 900.

1849 to 1853, inclusive. Obverse: Same type as the eagle, without date. Reverse: "1 dollar 1849" within a laurel wreath, "united states of America." Size 8.

1854. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same type as the three-dollar piece, Size 9.


Silver Dollar

Authorized to he coined. Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 416 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 412J grains. Fineness changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873. Coinage reauthorized, Act of February 28, 1878.

1794. Obverse: Liberty head, facing right, flowing hair, fifteen stars; above, “liberty;" beneath, "1794." Reverse: An eagle with raised wings, encircled by branches of laurel crossed; "United States of America." On the edge, “hundred cents, ONE DOLLAR OR UNIT." Size, 24.

1795. No. 1. Same.

1795. No. 2. Bust of Liberty, facing right, hair bound by a ribbon, shoulders draped, fifteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings, standing upon clouds, within a wreath of palm and laurel, which is crossed and tied, "United States of America."

1796. Same as No. 2, of 1795.

1797. No. 1. Same as Xo. 2 of 1795, with sixteen stars, six of which are facing.

1797. No. 2. Same, with seven stars facing.

1798. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1795, with fifteen stars.

1798. No. 2. Same, with thirteen stars.

1798. No. 3. Obverse: Same, with thirteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with raised wings, bearing the United States shield upon its breast, in beak, a scroll inscribed "e pluribus Unum." A bundle of thirteen arrows in the right talon, and an olive branch in the left. Above, are clouds, and thirteen stars. " united States of America." Size, 25.

1799 to 1804, inclusive. Same as No. 3, of 1798.

1805 to 1839, inclusive. None issued.

1840 to 1865, inclusive. Obverse: Liberty seated upon a rock, supporting with her right hand tlie United States shield, across which floats a scroll inscribed "liberty," and with her left the staff and liberty cap ; beneath, the date.

Reverse : An eagle with expanded wings, bearing the United States shield upon its breast, and an olive branch and three arrows in its talons. "United States of America," "One Dollar," Reeded edge; size, 24.

1866 to 1873, inclusive. Same, with a scroll above the eagle, inscribed, "in god we trust."

1874 to 1877, inclusive. None issued.

1878. Obverse: Liberty head facing left, upon which is a cap, a wheat and cotton wreath, and a band inscribed "liberty;" above, "e pluribus Unum;" beneath, the date. Thirteen stars. Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings pointing upwards; in right talon an olive branch with nine leaves; in the left, three arrows. In the field above, "in god we trust;" beneath, a semi- wreath, tied and crossed, reaching upwards to the wings; "united states of America." Some pieces of the above date (1878) were coined with eight feathers in the tail during the year, but seven have been adopted.


Silver Trade Dollar

Authorized to be coined, Act of February 12, 1873. Weight, 420 grains; fineness, 900.

1873. Obverse: Liberty seated upon a cotton bale, facing left ; in her extended right hand an olive branch ; in her left a scroll inscribed " liberty;" behind her a sheaf of wheat; beneath, a scroll inscribed "in god we Trust ;" thirteen stars ; " 1873."

Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings ; in talons three arrows and an olive branch ; above, a scroll inscribed " E pluribus Unum;" beneath, on field, "420 grains;" "900 fine." "United States of America". Size, 24.


Half Dollar

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 208 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 206] grains' Fineness changed. Act of .January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, Act of February 21, 1853, to 192 grains. Weight changed, Act of February 12, 1873, to 122 grams, or 192.9 grains.

1794 and 1795. Same type as the dollar of 1794. On the edge, "Fifty Cents Or Half A Dollar." Size, 21.

1796. No. 1. Same type as No. 2, dollar of 1795, with the denomination, " 2," inscribed on the base of the reverse. No. 2. Same, with sixteen star on the obverse.

1797. Same as No. 2, of 1796.

1798 to 1800, inclusive. None issued.

1801 to 1803 inclusive. Same type as No. 3, dollar of 1798.

1804. None issued.

1805 and 1806. Same as No. 3, dollar of 1798.

1807. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Obverse : Liberty head facing left, wearing a kind of turban, with "liberty" inscribed upon the band. Thirteen stars and date. Reverse : An eagle with expanded wings pointing downwards, bearing upon its breast, the U. S. Shield, an olive branch and three arrows in its talons ; above, in the field, a scroll inscribed " e pluribus Unum ;" beneath 50 C. " UNITED STATES OF AMERICA."

1808 to 1835 inclusive, same as No. 2 of 1807.

1836. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1807. No. 2. Obverse : Same.

Eeverse : An eagle with expanded wings pointing downwards, the U. S. shield upon its breast, an olive branch and three arrows in its talons, 'UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," reeded edge.

1837. Same as No. 2 of 1836.

1838. Obverse : Same as No. 2 of 1836. Reverse : Same ; " half dol." for " 50 c."

1839. No. 1. Same as 1838. No. 2. Same type as dollar of 1840.

1840 to 1852 inclusive, same.

1853. Obverse : Same with an arrow head on each side of the date. Reverse : Same, with a halo of rays around the edge.

1854. Same, without the rays.

1855. Same.

1856 to 1865 inclusive, same, without the arrow lieads.

1866 to 1872 inclusive, same, with scroll above the eagle inscribed "in God WE TRUST." (Some have been occasionally met with, which have been issued by the San Francisco Mint, without this legend in 1866.)

1873. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with arrow heads on each side of the date.

1874. Same.

1875. Same, without the arrow heads.



Silver Quarter Dollar

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 104 grains; Oneness, 892.4. Weight changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 103J grains Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, Act of February 21, 1853, to 96 grains. Weight changed, Act of February 12, 1873, to 6 grams, or 96.45 grains.

1796. Same type as No. 2 dollar of 1795, with reeded edge; size, 18 fifteen stars.

1797 to 1803. None issued.

1804 to 1807, inclusive. Same type as No. 3 dollar of 1798, beneath, “25c."

1808 to 1814, inclusive. None issued.

1815. Same type as No. 2 half dollar of 1807.

1816 and 1817. None issued.

1818 to 1825, inclusive. Same type as No. 2 half dollar of 1807, size 17.

1826. None issued.

1827 and 1828. Same type as No. 2 half dollar of 1807.

1829 and 1830. None issued.

1831 to 1837, inclusive. Same type as half dollar of 1807, with the diameter reduced from size 17 to size 15, and a corresponding increase in thickness and decrease of the size of devices, and the omission of the scroll, inscribed "e PLURiBtrs unum."

1838. No. 1. Same as 1837. No. 2. Same type as the dollar of 1840, with " QUAR. DOL." for "one doll."

1839 to 18.52, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1838.

1853. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with arrow heads on each side of date, and a halo of rays around the edge.

1854 and 1855. Same, without the rays.

1856 to 1865. Same, without the arrow heads.

1866 to 1872, inclusive. Same, with the scroll above the eagle, inscribed "in god we trust."

1873. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with an arrow head on each side of the date.

1874. Same.

1875. Same, without the arrow head.


Twenty-Cent Piece.

Authorized to be coined, Act of March 3, 1875. Weight, 5 grams, or 77.16-grains ; fineness, 900. Coinage discontinued. Act of May 2, 1878.

1875 to 1878, inclusive. Obverse : Same type as the dollar of 1840. Reverse: An eagle with displayed wings, three arrows, and an olive branch, two of the leaves of which nearest the stem, together with those drooping from the centre, overlap ; the terminating leaves on the end of the branch, however, do not. On each side a star. Plain edge. " United States of America " Twenty Cents." Size, 14.

Dime

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 41.6 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 41.1 grains. Fineness changed, Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed. Act of February 21, 1853, to 38.4 grains. Weight changed. Act of February 12, 1873, to 2i grams, or 38.58 grains.

1796. Same type as the No. 2 dollar of 1795 ; size 13 ; fifteen stars.

1797. No. 1. Same, with sixteen stars on the obverse. No. 2. Same, with thirteen stars on the obverse.

1798. No. 1. Same type as No. 3 dollar of 1798, with sixteen stars. No. 2. With thirteen stars on the obverse.

1799. None issued.

1800 to 1805, inclusive. Same as No. 3 of 1798.

1806. None issued,

1807. Same as No. 2 of 1798.

1808. None issued.

1809. Same type as No. 2 half-dollar of 1807; size, 12.

1810. None issued.

1811. Same as 1809.

1812 to 1813, inclusive. None issued.

1814. Same as 1809.

1815 to 1819, inclusive. None issued.

1820 to ls25, inclusive. Same as 1809.

1826. None issued.

1827 to 1836, inclusive. Same as 1809.

1837. No. 1. Same as 1809. No. 2. Obverse: Liberty seatad. No stars. Reverse: "one dime" within a wreath of laurel. "United States of AMERICA." Size, 11.

1838. No. 1. Same as No. 2 of 1837. No. 2. Same, with thirteen stars.

1839 to 1852, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1838.

1853. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with an arrow head on each side of the date.

1854 and 1855. Same as No. 2 of 1853.

1856 to 1859, inclusive. Same, without arrow heads.

1860 10 1872, inclusive. Obverse: Same, with “United States of America” instead of stars. Reverse: "one dime" within a wreath of corn, wheat, cotton, and
tobacco.

1873. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with an arrow head on each side of the date.

1874. Same as No. 2 of 1873.

1875. Same, without arrow heads.


Half-Dime

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 20.8 grains; fineness, 892.4. Weight changed, Act of .January 18, 1837, to 205 grains. Fineness changed. Act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, Act of February '21, 1853, to 19.2 grains. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873.

1794 and 1795. Same type as the half dollar; size, 10.

1796. Same type as No. 2 dollar of 1795; fifteen stars.

1797. No. 1. Same, with fifteen stars. No. 2. Same, with sixteen stars. No.3. Same, with thirteen stars.

1798 and 1799. None issued.

1800 to 1803, inclusive. Same type as No. 3 dollar of 1798.

1804. None issued.

1805. Same as 1800.

1806 to 1828, inclusive. None issued.

1829 to 1873. See dime.


Three Cent Piece

Authorized to be coined. Act of March 3, 1851. Weight, 12 grains; fineness, 750. Weight changed, Act of March 3, 1853, to 11.52 grains. Fineness changed. Act of March 3, 1853, to 900. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873.

1851 to 1853, inclusive. Obverse: A star bearing the United States shield. “United States of America.”  Reverse: An ornamented "o," within which is the denomination "lii;" around the border, thirteen stars; size, 9.

1854 to 1858. Obverse: Same, with two lines around the star. Reverse: An olive branch above the " iii," and three arrows below, all within the " c."

1858 to 1873, inclusive. Same, with one line around the star.   



Five cent piece (Nickel)

Authorized to be coined. Act of May 16, 1866. Weight, 77.16 grains; composed of 75 per cent, copper, and 25 per cent, nickel.

1866. Obverse : A United States shield surmounted by a cross, an olive branch pendent at each side, back of the base of the shield are two arrows, the heads and feathers are only visible; beneath, "1866;" above, in the field, " IN GOD WE TRUST." Reverse : " 5 " within a circle of thirteen stars, and rays, " UNITED STATES OF AMERICA." Size, 13.

1867. Same. No. 2. Same, without the rays

1868. Same as No. 2 of 1867.

1869 to 1882. Same as No. 2 of 1867.

1883. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Obverse: Liberty head wearing a coronet which is inscribed " liberty," thirteen stars, and date, " 1883." Reverse : A " V " within a wreath of corn and cotton. Legend, “United States of America” Exergue, " E Pluribus Unum." No. 3, Obverse: Same as No. 2. Reverse: Same, with "cents " as the exergue, and "E pluribus unum" above the wreath.

1884. Same as No. 3 of the preceding.



Three cent piece

Authorized to be coined, Act of April 3, 1865. Weight, 30 grains; composed of 75 per cent, copper, and 25 per cent, nickel.

1865. Obverse : Liberty head, facing left, hair bound by a ribbon, on the forehead a coronet inscribed " liberty ;" beneath, the date, “United States of America”  Reverse; "lll" within a laurel wreath.

Minor Coins Two Cent Piece (bronze).

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 22, 1864. Weight, 96 grains, composed of ninety-five per cent, copper and five per cent, of tin and zinc. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 12, 1873.

1864 to 1873, inclusive. Obverse: The United States shield, behind which are two arrows, crossed, on each side a branch of laurel; above a scroll inscribed “in god we trust; " beneath, the date. Reverse: "2 cents" within a wreath of wheat, “United States of America” Size, 14.


Cent (copper)

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 22, 1792. Weight, 264 grains. Weight changed. Act of January 14, 1793, to 208 grains. Weight changed by proclamation of the President, January 26, 1796, in conformity with an Act of March 3, 1795, to 168 grains. Coinage discontinued, Act of February 21, 1857.

1793. No. 1. Obverse : Liberty head, facing right, flowing hair. Above "liberty": beneath, "1793." '

Reverse: A chain of fifteen links, within which is inscribed "one cent" and the fraction "" United States of America; reeded edge ; size, 17.

No. 2. Same, with the abbreviation "ameri." in the Legend.

No. 3. Obverse: Same as No. 1, with a sprig beneath.

Reverse: "one cent" within a wreath of laurel, “United States of America.” Reeded edge.

No. 4. Obverse: A bust of Liberty, facing right, with pole and liberty cap. Above, "LIBERTY'"; beneath, " 1793."

Reverse: Same as No. 3 ; on the edge, " one hundred for a dollar " Size, 18.

1794 and 1795. Same as No. 4 of 1793.

1796. No. 1 . Same. No. 2. Same, with hair bound by a ribbon and without pole and Liberty cap on the obverse. Plain edge.

1797 to 1807 inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1796.

1808 to 1814, inclusive. Obverse: Liberty head, facing left, hair confined by a band, inscribed " liberty." Thirteen stars and date.

Reverse: "one cent," within a laurel wreath, “United States of America.” The fraction "j-JV' is omitted.

1815. None issued.

1816. Obverse: Liberty head, facing left, the lair is confined by a roll, and tied by a cord, while the forehead is decked with a tiara, inscribed "LIBERTY."

Reverse: Same as 1808.

1817. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with fifteen stars. 1818 to 1836. Same as No. 1 of 1817.

1837. No. 1. Same. No. 2. Same, with the lair tied by a string of beads instead of a cord.

1838 to 1857, inclusive. Same as No. 2 of 1837.


Cent (Nickel)

Authorized to be coined. Act of February 21, 1857. Weight 72 grains; composed of 88 per cent, copper and 12 per cent, nickel. Coinage discontinued. Act of April 22, 1864.

1857 and 1858. Obverse: An eagle lying to the left, “United States of America”

Reverse: "one cent," within a wreath of corn, wheat, cotton, and tobacco. Size, 11.

1859. Obverse : An Indian-head, facing left, bedecked with eagle plumes, confined. “United States of America” Beneath, the date. Reverse: "one cent." within a wreath of laurel.

1860 to 1864, inclusive. Obverse: Same. Reverse: "one cent," within an oak wreath and shield.



Cent (Bronze)

Coinage authorized, Act of April 22, 1857. Weight, 48 grains; composed of 95 per cent, copper and 5 per cent, of tin and zinc.

1864. Same type as nickel cent of 1860. Size, 12.



Half-Cent (Copper)

Authorized to be coined. Act of April 2, 1792. Weight, 132 grains. Weight changed, Act of January 14, 1793, to 104 grains. Weight changed by proclamation of the President, January 26, 1796, in conformity with Act of March 3, 1795, to 84 grains. Coinage discontinued. Act of February 21, 1857.

1793. Same type as cent No. 4, 1793, with head facing left. On the edge, "two hundred for a dollar." Size, 14.

1794. Same type as the cent of 1794.

1795 to 1797, inclusive. Same, with plain edge.

1798 and 1799. None issued.

1800. Same type as No. 2 cent of 1796, with the fraction "^is" on the base of the reverse.

1801. None issued.

1802 to 1808, inclusive. Same as 1800. From 1808, the fraction "^-J-," omitted.

1809 to 1811, inclusive. Same type as cent of 1808.

1812 to 1824, inclusive. None issued.

1825 and 1826. Same type as cent of 1808.

1827. None issued.

1828. No. 1. Same type as cent 1808, with thirteen stars. No. 2. Same, with twelve stars.

1829. Same, with thirteen stars.

1830. None issued.

1831 to 1836, inclusive. Same type as cent of 1808.

1837 to 1839, inclusive. None issued.

1840 to 1857, inclusive. Same type as No. 2 cent of 1837; size, 14.






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